COVID-19 Vaccination Uptake Program

Study Title: Driving VAccination Confidence through Social media Innovations (D-VACSI)

Grameen aimed to study the role of social media on increasing vaccination confidence and uptake amongst the marginalized section in rural parts of the four states and delineate the effect on vaccination confidence and uptake on the basis of key parameters such as gender, age, vulnerability, and social class. A quasi-experimental approach was adopted to realize the objectives of the study. The experiments conducted under the D-VACSI project have been participatory in nature, leveraging the trust bestowed in local health workers, doctors, and community leaders. The multi-disciplinary collaboration with partners for conducting the experiment yielded deep outreach amongst rural low-income households, especially the poorest of the poor and women. The experiment also reached out to a group of wage laborers and farming communities. The overall focus of this experiment has been to generate actionable insights for increasing vaccination confidence through innovative use of social media platforms for low-income rural households and excluded communities, with the following specific aims:

  1. Testing the efficacy of social media platforms such as WhatsApp, Facebook, and YouTube in resolving information asymmetry regarding vaccine availability and driving the uptake of COVID19 vaccine amongst low-income rural households in India;
  2. Testing the efficacy of social media platforms such as WhatsApp, Facebook, and YouTube in resolving vaccination hesitancy and uptake through targeted video or audio messaging amongst low-income rural households in India;
  3. Comparing and contrasting the efficacy of social media channels in resolving vaccination hesitancy and driving vaccine uptake amongst low-income rural households through phygital model vs. digital model;
  4. Testing and assessing the efficacy of different models of influence (Ref ‘Influence’ by Robert B Cialdini) such as social proof, unity, authority, scarcity, liking, and reciprocation;
  5. Assessing barriers and enablers in the scalability and replication of successful models of influence using social media platforms in driving vaccine uptake amongst low-income rural households; and
  6. Understanding policy implications and disseminate learnings on the usage of social media to advance the global agenda around vaccination confidence and uptake.